Episode 150 – Diets Don’t Work . Omega 3’s Do Work . LSD Might Work

Episode 150 – Diets Don’t Work . Omega 3’s Do Work . LSD Might Work

Happy and Healthy New Year on your DIET!
As it turns out you may not be responsible for the lack of results on your diet. Maybe you should blame it on your parents or better yet just concentrate of eating healthy and exercising regularly. You’ll be much happier. Listen here.
Fish, Fish, and more FISH!
Did you know about Fish? Did you know all the things that Omega 3’s are responsible for. Higher IQ and Better Sleep is only the beginning. Listen, and you’ll be feasting on fish nightly.
Spoonful of Sugar Makes the Medicine go Down
Remember the summer of ’67. San Francisco, New York and “Picture yourself on a boat on a river.” Well now their is micro-dosing. Go to work, feel good and . . .

Tania Ortega-Cowan Joins David Yakir as Co-host of Season III of Yak About Today

Tania Ortega-Cowan Joins David Yakir as Co-host of Yak About Today

Yak About Today

 

Listen to Yak About Today Below

 

Apple wants its Apple Watch to be a must for Diabetics and is Poor Sleep Killing YOU! That’s what we Yak About . Today

Apple wants its Apple Watch to be a must for Diabetics and is Poor Sleep Killing YOU!

And: Apple the eco-community friendly Business

The next time you tell yourself that you’ll sleep when you’re dead, realize that you’re making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer.

the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep.

For more info: Read on.

# CNBC : Apple wants its watch to be essential for Diabetics

 

 

by Daniel Cooper, engadget.comApril 13, 2017
Apple is quietly developing a sensor that can monitor a person’s blood sugar levels continuously and non-invasively. If successful, the technology will be integrated into a future version of the Apple Watch to help people with diabetes manage their condition. the project was set up by Steve Jobs before his death.

According to the report, Apple has quietly hired engineers to work in secret. It’s believed that the company has been so successful it is already running trials of the sensors at “clinical sites” in San Francisco’s Bay Area. In fact, progress has been so encouraging that Apple has already hired consultants to help it navigate the torturous process of getting FDA approval.

There are a number of practical issues to overcome, including the fact that using optical sensors to read blood glucose is /hard/. The world is littered with companies that have tried — and failed — to use noninvasive monitoring for this particular issue.

Right now, the only effective way to continuously monitor someone’s blood glucose level is with implants or other invasive tech. Continuous glucose monitors often use a stomach-based implant that connects with a transmitter that’s held on the outside of your stomach. Even new wearables like KTrack use tiny needles that burrow into the skin in order to work.

According to statistics from the World Health Organization, there were 422 million people living with diabetes in 2014. That’s up from 108 million in 1980, a staggering increase for a disease that is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, stroke and heart attacks. In addition, the better part of four million deaths per year can be directly attributed to diabetes-related conditions.

If Apple can, somehow, innovate where so many others have not, then it will make the number of people who have reason to purchase a Watch increase exponentially.

#Yakabout/50117

# Apple’s new Danish data center will supply heat to nearby homes, fertilizer to farmers

Apple’s commitment to [environmental sustainability](https://9to5mac.com/guides/environment/) is well established, but the company is going one step further in its new Danish data center. In addition to powering the center entirely from renewable energy, the company is capturing the waste heat generated and feeding it into a district heating system, to warm local homes …
> The data center in the Jutland region will be partly powered by recycling waste products from farms. Apple is working with Aarhus University on a system that passes agricultural waste through a digester to generate methane, which is then used to help power the data center. The digester reaction turns some of the waste into nutrient-rich fertilizer, which Apple returns to local farmers to use on their fields.

The center should also be making a worthwhile contribution to the Danish economy. The government [said last year](https://9to5mac.com/2016/10/03/apple-data-center-denmark-jutland-foulum/) that the $950M project represented the largest foreign capital investment in the country’s history.
Apple said in its annual Environment Responsibility Report that it is working toward a goal of making all of its products from [100% recycled materials](https://9to5mac.com/2017/04/19/apple-stop-mining-announcement/), ending the need for mining.

#yakabout/50117

How Many Pills Are Too Many? How to Get Those Pills on the Cheap. And Oh Nuts! – That’s what we Yak About Today.

How Many Pills Are Too Many? How to Get Those Pills on the Cheap. And Oh Nuts! – That’s what we Yak About Today.

By Scott Gelber

Popping Pills

The point of prescription drugs is to help us get or feel well. Yet Americans are taking so many medications that doctors are being encouraged to pause before prescribing and think about   as well.

Yet an increasing number of Americans — typically older ones with multiple chronic conditions — are taking drugs and supplements they don’t need, or so many of them that those substances are [interacting]

Though many prescription drugs are highly valuable, taking them can also be dangerous, particularly taking a lot of them at once. The vast majority of higher-quality studies summarized in [a systematic review]

Listen to Yak About. Today for the complete story.

Blink Health

Blink Health scours the Internet to find out what people are actually paying for their prescriptions. Then, in the case of generic medications, Blink Health negotiates with the pharmacy to get a certain price.**

Say you need to pick up a prescription for your medication, but you have a high deductible plan that requires you to pay $3,000 out of your own pocket before your insurance starts picking up the rest of the tab. Instead of going to the pharmacy and accepting whatever price they offer (which can vary from pharmacy to pharmacy), you could download the Blink Health app, or go to the company’s website.

In the app, you can find your prescription and purchase it directly through the app. Then, when you get to the pharmacy counter, you show your phone to the pharmacist who rings it up instead.

There are other prescription services that can show you different retail prices, such as GoodRx. One of the biggest differences between Blink Health and those sites are that instead of possibly having to choose a different pharmacy from the one you usually go to, Blink Health users can still go to their regular pharmacy, so long as it accepts Blink Health, which more than 57,000 do.

Oh Nuts!

But what /exactly/ are you getting from your afternoon snack of nuts? I’ve got a few nuts for you and I’ll tell you what they do

We found all that important information in an easy-to-read infographic. It breaks down the health benefits found in some of the most popular snacking nuts. Check it out:

 

Yak About Health Featuring “How to Talk to your Doctor” and Alexa Becomes a Virtual Doctor

Yak About Health Featuring “How to Talk to your Doctor”

How To Talk To Your Doctor

We thank We thank Amy Paturel, over at aarp.org

If you’ve ever felt like your doctor isn’t listening to you, it may be true. Studies have found that doctors let patients speak for only 23 seconds on average before cutting them off; in one University of South Carolina study, primary care patients were interrupted just 12 seconds after the physician entered the exam room.

When there’s less doctor-patient dialogue, patients are not only more likely to leave the office frustrated, but they’re also at greater risk of being misdiagnosed.

WEVE GOT A FEW STRATEGIES YOU CAN TRY to maximize your office visit and talk so your doctor will listen.

Make a human connection

Neuendorf, M.D., medical director for the Center of Excellence in Health Care Communication at the Cleveland Clinic suggests.

Before you dive into your concerns, break the ice with a greeting or even a joke. “Doctors are people first, and were much more receptive when a patient begins a conversation with a simple, ‘How’s your day going?’

Stay on message

Most doctor visits last 13 to 16 minutes, according to Medscape’s 2016 “Physician Compensation Report,” so after your greeting, get to the point. “Oversharing information unrelated to your medical concerns takes time away from tailoring a treatment plan,” Neuendorf says.

Tell the whole truth

You can’t expect a doctor to listen to your complaints, or adequately resolve them, if you’re not forthright. Tell your doctor about your fear of falling, substance abuse, sexual dysfunction or changes in sleep patterns.

*Rehearse OR WRITE IT DOWN before you go

If you’re uncomfortable discussing embarrassing topics, write a script and rehearse it in front of a mirror. Use words like incontinent, bowel movements and diarrhea so that when you’re talking to the doctor, you’ll be more comfortable saying them aloud.

Don’t accept ‘it’s just aging’

If you have a symptom that has come on suddenly, keeps you up at night or interferes with your daily life, be specific about the changes you’ve noticed. “For example, you could say, ‘I’ve always been on time for appointments, but lately I’m forgetting them entirely. Is there a test you can do to rule out a more serious cognitive issue?’ ” says Mary Jane Minkin, M.D., clinical professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Yale Medical School.

Don’t save questions for the end

Minkin suggests. Once your doctor is halfway out the door, he or she is already thinking about the next patient. Instead, come with a list of concerns and address them within the first few minutes of your visit,

Explain what you can afford

Most doctors don’t have a clue about patients’ out-of-pocket costs. Some aren’t even sure which procedures, prescriptions and lab tests are covered by insurance or Medicare. “But that doesn’t mean they’re not willing to work with you to lower costs,” Neuendorf says. If you can’t afford a prescription, ask your doctor for an alternative, or ask him or her to help you prioritize your medications, so you know which ones you can skip and which ones are nonnegotiable.

Have that end-of-life discussion

Talk to your family about what you want done when you are near death, and make sure your doctor is aware of those wishes. “Writing it down as part of an advance directive isn’t enough,” says David Grube, M.D., medical director of the nonprofit Compassion and Choices in Denver. “Make sure there’s a document in your medical chart that spells out exactly what you want. With smartphone technology, you can even take 90 seconds and film an advance directive in your physician’s office.” For help with managing end-of-life care, go to compassionandchoices.org/eolc-tools.

Don’t go it alone

Bringing a loved one or family member to your medical visits can help ensure that the doctor listens to you and answers your questions. Your loved one can take notes, remind you about issues you wanted to discuss and help you remember doctors’ instructions after the visit is over.

Don’t be afraid to make a switch

If your doctor rushes through visits, doesn’t address your questions or fails to listen to you without interrupting, look for a new physician. “There’s no shame in finding someone who’s a better fit,” Grube says.

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