181 Doc Glenn Livingston knows how to stop Binge Eating – Now listen and STOP IT!

Glenn Livingston, Ph.D. is a veteran psychologist and was the long time CEO of a multi-million dollar consulting firm which has serviced several Fortune 500 clients in the food industry. You may have seen his (or his company’s)  previous work, theories, and research in major periodicals like The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Sun Times, The Indiana Star Ledger, The NY Daily News, American Demographics, or any of the other major media outlets you see on this page.  You may also have heard him on ABC, WGN, and/or CBS radio, or UPN TV. 

 

Disillusioned by what traditional psychology had to offer overweight and/or food obsessed individuals, Dr. Livingston spent several decades researching the nature of bingeing and overeating via work with his own patients AND a self-funded research program with more than 40,000 participants.  Most important, however, was his own personal journey out of obesity and food prison to a normal, healthy weight and a much more lighthearted relationship with food.

181 Thom King takes us on a Keto Journey – Yak About Today Summer Series Continues

I woke up that morning in a suite at the Luxor Hotel in Las Vegas. I felt terrible.
I was in town for a trade show and the night before a client had taken me to dinner. We ordered these massive, hundred-dollar steaks, drank several glasses of wine, and gorged ourselves on ice cream and desserts.

I’d brought the leftovers back to the room and they were still sitting on the counter. I glanced around the room. Although they had upgraded my room to a suite, the place was run down and sad. There was a Jacuzzi in the middle of the room and the place reeked of alcohol a previous guest had spilled.

I got out of bed and looked at myself in the full-length mirror. I was six-foot-two and I weighed 235 pounds I carried it well, but, not well enough. I felt sick. I was flabby and tired and filled with regret and remorse. I was going through my second divorce, I was in a lawsuit with my first wife, and my blood pressure was so high that my doctor had put me on medicine to control it. Vegas baby!

As I stood in front of the mirror, I asked myself, “How the hell did I get here?”

Part CEO, part personal development wonk, and part biohacker info geek, King is a self-confessed serial entrepreneur. While his favorite book list contains many success-oriented and personal-development classics, the classic definition of achieving success (e.g. make a lot of money) is not what inspires or motivates King. He follows more of a “you aren’t doing well unless you’re also doing some good” line of thinking. King’s company has been built around the simple principle of “do the right thing.”

Founded by King in 1999, Stevia Brands Inc. is one of the largest importers, manufacturers and distributors of clean-label sweetening systems and natural sweeteners. Emulating such renowned entrepreneurs such as the Wright Brothers and Steve Jobs, King started his company by first asking the critical question, “Why?” Based on the understanding that it’s only by determining the “why” of what you want to do that you can achieve lasting success, King’s business isn’t simply something he does for a living. It stands as a testament to who he is, what he does and how he lives his life.

King’s “why” is simple. A bit of a foodie and health nut, food has always been a passion for King — particularly high-quality food that makes the planet a healthier place and maintains a level of sustainability. He founded Steviva as a way to effectively help combat metabolic disease and the “diabesity” (his self-coined term) epidemic in this country by offering clean-label sweetening systems to replace sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup.

 

180 Yak About Today Fall Series with Dr. Stephen Lewis – Take your Vitamins for god sake.

Have you ever wondered how your nutrition and the nutritional supplements you take each day affect your overall health? Many doctors, nutritionists, and even fitness trainers recommend taking a multi-vitamin or nutrition supplement to their patients and clients because, in today’s society, most people aren’t getting the vitamins and nutrients they need in their normal daily diet.

Dr. Stephen Lewis talks  about the use of dietary supplements and how they affect your lab test results as well as your overall health and wellness. Dr. Lewis is a chiropractor with a long history of helping people achieve their maximum potential.

Episode 150 – Diets Don’t Work . Omega 3’s Do Work . LSD Might Work

Episode 150 – Diets Don’t Work . Omega 3’s Do Work . LSD Might Work

Happy and Healthy New Year on your DIET!
As it turns out you may not be responsible for the lack of results on your diet. Maybe you should blame it on your parents or better yet just concentrate of eating healthy and exercising regularly. You’ll be much happier. Listen here.
Fish, Fish, and more FISH!
Did you know about Fish? Did you know all the things that Omega 3’s are responsible for. Higher IQ and Better Sleep is only the beginning. Listen, and you’ll be feasting on fish nightly.
Spoonful of Sugar Makes the Medicine go Down
Remember the summer of ’67. San Francisco, New York and “Picture yourself on a boat on a river.” Well now their is micro-dosing. Go to work, feel good and . . .

Apple wants its Apple Watch to be a must for Diabetics and is Poor Sleep Killing YOU! That’s what we Yak About . Today

Apple wants its Apple Watch to be a must for Diabetics and is Poor Sleep Killing YOU!

And: Apple the eco-community friendly Business

The next time you tell yourself that you’ll sleep when you’re dead, realize that you’re making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer.

the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep.

For more info: Read on.

# CNBC : Apple wants its watch to be essential for Diabetics

 

 

by Daniel Cooper, engadget.comApril 13, 2017
Apple is quietly developing a sensor that can monitor a person’s blood sugar levels continuously and non-invasively. If successful, the technology will be integrated into a future version of the Apple Watch to help people with diabetes manage their condition. the project was set up by Steve Jobs before his death.

According to the report, Apple has quietly hired engineers to work in secret. It’s believed that the company has been so successful it is already running trials of the sensors at “clinical sites” in San Francisco’s Bay Area. In fact, progress has been so encouraging that Apple has already hired consultants to help it navigate the torturous process of getting FDA approval.

There are a number of practical issues to overcome, including the fact that using optical sensors to read blood glucose is /hard/. The world is littered with companies that have tried — and failed — to use noninvasive monitoring for this particular issue.

Right now, the only effective way to continuously monitor someone’s blood glucose level is with implants or other invasive tech. Continuous glucose monitors often use a stomach-based implant that connects with a transmitter that’s held on the outside of your stomach. Even new wearables like KTrack use tiny needles that burrow into the skin in order to work.

According to statistics from the World Health Organization, there were 422 million people living with diabetes in 2014. That’s up from 108 million in 1980, a staggering increase for a disease that is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, stroke and heart attacks. In addition, the better part of four million deaths per year can be directly attributed to diabetes-related conditions.

If Apple can, somehow, innovate where so many others have not, then it will make the number of people who have reason to purchase a Watch increase exponentially.

#Yakabout/50117

# Apple’s new Danish data center will supply heat to nearby homes, fertilizer to farmers

Apple’s commitment to [environmental sustainability](https://9to5mac.com/guides/environment/) is well established, but the company is going one step further in its new Danish data center. In addition to powering the center entirely from renewable energy, the company is capturing the waste heat generated and feeding it into a district heating system, to warm local homes …
> The data center in the Jutland region will be partly powered by recycling waste products from farms. Apple is working with Aarhus University on a system that passes agricultural waste through a digester to generate methane, which is then used to help power the data center. The digester reaction turns some of the waste into nutrient-rich fertilizer, which Apple returns to local farmers to use on their fields.

The center should also be making a worthwhile contribution to the Danish economy. The government [said last year](https://9to5mac.com/2016/10/03/apple-data-center-denmark-jutland-foulum/) that the $950M project represented the largest foreign capital investment in the country’s history.
Apple said in its annual Environment Responsibility Report that it is working toward a goal of making all of its products from [100% recycled materials](https://9to5mac.com/2017/04/19/apple-stop-mining-announcement/), ending the need for mining.

#yakabout/50117

How Many Pills Are Too Many? How to Get Those Pills on the Cheap. And Oh Nuts! – That’s what we Yak About Today.

How Many Pills Are Too Many? How to Get Those Pills on the Cheap. And Oh Nuts! – That’s what we Yak About Today.

By Scott Gelber

Popping Pills

The point of prescription drugs is to help us get or feel well. Yet Americans are taking so many medications that doctors are being encouraged to pause before prescribing and think about   as well.

Yet an increasing number of Americans — typically older ones with multiple chronic conditions — are taking drugs and supplements they don’t need, or so many of them that those substances are [interacting]

Though many prescription drugs are highly valuable, taking them can also be dangerous, particularly taking a lot of them at once. The vast majority of higher-quality studies summarized in [a systematic review]

Listen to Yak About. Today for the complete story.

Blink Health

Blink Health scours the Internet to find out what people are actually paying for their prescriptions. Then, in the case of generic medications, Blink Health negotiates with the pharmacy to get a certain price.**

Say you need to pick up a prescription for your medication, but you have a high deductible plan that requires you to pay $3,000 out of your own pocket before your insurance starts picking up the rest of the tab. Instead of going to the pharmacy and accepting whatever price they offer (which can vary from pharmacy to pharmacy), you could download the Blink Health app, or go to the company’s website.

In the app, you can find your prescription and purchase it directly through the app. Then, when you get to the pharmacy counter, you show your phone to the pharmacist who rings it up instead.

There are other prescription services that can show you different retail prices, such as GoodRx. One of the biggest differences between Blink Health and those sites are that instead of possibly having to choose a different pharmacy from the one you usually go to, Blink Health users can still go to their regular pharmacy, so long as it accepts Blink Health, which more than 57,000 do.

Oh Nuts!

But what /exactly/ are you getting from your afternoon snack of nuts? I’ve got a few nuts for you and I’ll tell you what they do

We found all that important information in an easy-to-read infographic. It breaks down the health benefits found in some of the most popular snacking nuts. Check it out:

 

Is Cancer a matter of Bad Luck? Walk, Stretch or Dance? Which is Better for the Brain. We Yak About this and more.

Is Cancer a matter of Bad Luck? Walk, Stretch or Dance? Which is Better for the Brain. We Yak About this and more.

 

Without a cure in sight, cancer has become one of society’s biggest concerns. The fear of getting it is enough for many people to change their lifestyles in dramatic and meaningful ways, and even though it’s increasingly possible to beat the disease, it remains one of the biggest universal health worries.

As it turns out, all that anxiety may be for nothing, as new research suggests that getting cancer is more about bad luck than lifestyle factors, though it’s still possible to lessen your overall chances.

As it turns out, all that anxiety may be for nothing, as new research suggests that getting cancer is more about bad luck than lifestyle factors, though it’s still possible to lessen your overall chances.

Usually Science has historically kept its distance when it comes to estimating the number of cancers that are caused by any particular factor, and what cases of the disease would have happened regardless of outside influence. Johns Hopkins University scientists published a new study in the journal Science that does exactly what researchers have avoided doing for ages, and the figures may come as a bit of a surprise.

The team sought to pinpoint the cause of the genetic mutations that cause cancer, and determine what influenced the outcome. Shockingly, the data suggests that a full 66% of the mutations that eventually result in cancer are completely random errors in the DNA, with no direct cause. Environmental factors — like smoking, pollution, and all the other things we think of as being triggers for the disease — account for about 29% of cancers. The last 5% are thought to be inherited.

The scientists explain that DNA mutations normally don’t occur in genes with cancer-causing ability, and therefor don’t have any negative consequences. When mutations randomly occur in certain genes, however, cancer may result, and most of the time it’s simply “bad luck.”

Walk, Stretch or Dance? Dancing May Be Best for the Brain

by GRETCHEN REYNOLDS, nytimes.com

April 5, 2017

Could learning to dance the minuet or fandango help to protect our brains from aging?

A new study that compared the neurological effects of country dancing with those of walking and other activities suggests that there may be something unique about learning a social dance. The demands it places on the mind and body could make it unusually potent at slowing some of the changes inside our skulls that seem otherwise inevitable with aging.

Neuroscientists and those in middle age or beyond know that brains alter and slow as we grow older. Processing speed, which is a measure of how rapidly our brains can absorb, assess and respond to new information, seems to be particularly hard hit. Most people who are older than about 40 perform worse on tests of processing speed than those who are younger, with the effects accelerating as the decades pass.

Scientists suspect that this decline is due in large part to a concomitant fraying of our brain’s white matter, which is its wiring. White matter consists of specialized cells and their offshoots that pass messages between neurons and from one part of the brain to another. In young brains, these messages whip from neuron to neuron with boggling speed. But in older people, brain scans show, the white matter can be skimpier and less efficient. Messages stutter and slow.

Whether this age-related decline in white matter is inexorable, however, or might instead be changeable has been unclear.

So for the new study, which was published this month in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Illinois in Urbana and other schools decided to look at the effects of several different types of exercise on the wiring and the function of older people’s brains.

They began by recruiting 174 healthy people in their 60s and 70s with no signs of cognitive impairment. Most were sedentary, although some occasionally exercised.

Then they invited the men and women to a university lab for tests of their aerobic fitness and mental capacities, including processing speed and a brain scan with a sophisticated M.R.I. machine.

Finally, the researchers randomly divided the volunteers into several groups. One began a supervised program of brisk walking for an hour three times a week. Another started a regimen of supervised gentle stretching and balance training three times a week.

The last group was assigned to learn to dance. These men and women showed up to a studio three times a week for an hour and practiced increasingly intricate country-dance choreography, with the group shaping itself into fluid lines and squares and each person moving from partner to partner.

After six months, the volunteers returned to the lab to repeat the tests and the brain scans from the study’s start.

The differences now proved to be both promising and worrisome.

By and large, everyone’s brain showed some signs of what the scientists termed “degeneration” of the white matter. The changes were subtle, involving slight thinning of the size and number of connections between neurons.

But the effects were surprisingly widespread throughout people’s brains, given that only six months had elapsed since the first scans, said Agnieszka Burzynska, the study’s lead author and a professor of human development and neuroscience at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. (She was previously a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Illinois.)

The degeneration was especially noticeable in the oldest volunteers and those who had been the most sedentary before joining the study.

However, one group showed an actual improvement in the health of some of the white matter in their brains, compared to six months before. The dancers now had denser white matter in their fornix, a part of the brain involved with processing speed and memory.

It seems likely that the cognitive demands of the dancing, which required people to learn and master new choreography throughout the six months of the study, affected the biochemistry of the brain tissue in the fornix, Dr. Burzynska said, prompting increases in the thickness and quantity of the wiring there.

Interestingly, none of the changes in the volunteers’ white matter were obviously reflected in their cognitive performance. Almost everyone performed better now on thinking tests than at the study’s start, including tests of their processing speed, even if their white matter was skimpier.

These results indicate that there could be a time lag between when the brain changes structurally and when we start having trouble thinking and remembering, Dr. Burzynska said.

But, more encouraging, she said, they also suggest that engaging in “any activities involving moving and socializing,” as each of these group programs did, might perk up mental abilities in aging brains.

“The message is that we should try not to be sedentary,” she said. “The people who came into our study already exercising showed the least decline” in white matter health, she points out, and those who took up dancing showed white-matter gains.

Of course, this study was relatively short-term. Dr. Burzynska hopes in the future to study the brains of people engaging in different types of exercise over the course of several years.

But for now, she says the data provide another rationale for moving — and perhaps also learning to contra dance and sashay.

© 2017 The New York Times Company.

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DAVID YAKIR HERE for YAK ABOUT HELPING YOU BE BETTER, HEALTHIER AND MORE INFORMED THAN ANY GENERATION THAT CAME BEFORE.

Interview with Rebecca Katz, Author of “Cancer Fighting Kitchen” and “Clean Soups” on Yak About Health

Interview with Rebecca Katz, Author of “Cancer Fighting Kitchen” and “Clean Soups”

Yak About

Cancer Fighting Kitchen

Clean Soups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spouse Bill became so nuts about some of the recipes that I went back an found the interview that I did with Rebecca Katz, who is the one that introduced us to the concept of “Food as Medicine” Listen to the interview. I’m hoping to have her back on soon. I believe that today everyone has to have a basic understanding of the importance of food as the logical response to many of the ailments that befall us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yak About Health and certainly the Healthiest Half Hour of Recommendations We’ve done to date

Yak About Health and certainly the Healthiest Half Hour of Recommendations We’ve Done to Date!

Today we yak about Health:

David Yakir on I Heart Radio’s “Yak About”

Topic one: is timing your meals important
Topic Two: Slowing Down the aging process and what are tellemeres?
topic three: Can drinking coffee slow aging
Topic four: 6 Memory Boosters for you and your mate
And on our yak about tech segment
the 7 best tech items from amazon basics